Intrinsic satisfaction – another way to measure blogging success.

We use a variety of measures in many stages of our lives to determine whether or not we have been successful. Most of us will have some perspective on the shape of our lives as it unfolds and whether or not we believe that we have achieved some measure of success. Most often we measure ourselves and the worth of our activities based on external factors.

In the field of work, an entire industry exists to create numerous metrics by which we can measure our achievements. In the world of sport, we either win or we lose. In the world of the arts, we create and assign success by whether or not others either purchase our works or admire them in some way. In the political realm, you are either voted in or you are voted out.

Long lasting relationships are often deemed to be successful, and family members sometimes measure their self worth based on achievements of their partners or their children. For some of us, the number of friends we have has become a symbol often used to assess our self worth.

Since I have started blogging, I have read many posts on how to develop your brand and write about your niche. There are many strategies and techniques described and shared so you can have readers follow you, like your posts, etc. Content concepts seem to outshine the creative process of writing. One begins to wonder if the way to determine the achievement of blogging success can only be determined by statistics.

When was the last time you did any activity in your life without the expectation of measuring up, without checking the graphs, number of likes, and analysis of insights?

What if you enjoy becoming lost in the flow of writing and posting ideas that emerge in a creative daily life with the hopes of engaging others but not worrying about whether or not the idea measures up through statistical analysis?

Is it possible to create, connect, and enjoy the writing that abounds in this blogging world simply for the pleasure of the experience? Surely, if we could quantify and measure our intrinsic satisfaction, it would precede any other measures of success that we strive to achieve.